Discipline Code

Simplified Discipline Code
Official Discipline Code
Discipline Code Summary

BCC Intensive English Program
Simplified Discipline Code for Learning Stage Three

Introduction:

Good classroom discipline is essential for the a positive, harmonious and safe classroom environment. It also helps create an environment conducive to learning.
This policy should serve as the official policy for use when action is needed beyond personal class management strategies, protocols, and in-class penalties or incentives used by individual teachers.

These are habits that good students should have:

  • polite, respectful behaviour
  • arriving to class on time
  • bringing materials
  • close attentiveness in class
  • doing all assigned work
  • always speaking English

These behaviours are recognized, appreciated and rewarded by the teacher.

These are habits that good students need to avoid:

  • general disruptive behaviour
  • playing and talking in class
  • coming to class late
  • not doing assignments
  • not having materials

These behaviours are Minor Offenses.

These are habits good students should not have:

  • using mobile phones
  • cheating in class
  • cheating on exams
  • cursing
  • gross disrespect for the teacher
  • damaging school property
  • stealing
  • intimidating or bullying or fighting other students

These behaviours are Serious Offenses.

(Note that for administrative purposes, cheating in class and cursing would be considered Minor Misconduct; but for moral, ethical and interpersonal reasons, they should be framed as Gross Misconduct.)

Consequences for Negative Behaviour:

First Step for a Minor Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Teacher
  • Optional Detention with the Teacher

Second Step for a Minor Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Teacher
  • Mandatory Detention with the Teacher
  • Optional Action by the Coordinator

Third Step for a Minor Offense or Serious Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Coordinator
  • Detention with the Coordinator
  • Optional Action by the Department Head

One Step Policy for Serious Offenses

  • Serious Offenses include stealing, cheating on exams, gross disrespect for the teacher, damaging school property; or intimidating or bullying or fighting other students.
  • These are offenses that should go immediately to the third level, at least as far as having coordinator and department head being made aware of the incident. A special incident report is mandatory and should be filed as soon as possible.
  • Detention is assigned for two sessions within the week, one with the teacher and one with the coordinator, either at break or at lunch (20 minutes).
  • The coordinator will speak to the student; and the department head may speak to the student or his parents at their discretion.

BCC Intensive English Program
Official Discipline Code for Learning Stage Three

Introduction:

Good classroom discipline is essential for the a positive, harmonious and safe classroom environment. It also helps create an environment conducive to learning.

This policy should serve as the official policy for use when action is needed beyond personal class management strategies, protocols, and in-class penalties or incentives used by individual teachers.

Introduction:

Good classroom discipline is essential for the a positive, harmonious and safe classroom environment. It also helps create an environment conducive to learning.

This policy should serve as the official policy for use when action is needed beyond personal class management strategies, protocols, and in-class penalties or incentives used by individual teachers, and is broadly outlined the following way:

The Teacher's Responsibilities:

Classroom discipline is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. Therefore it is expected that teachers will deal with discipline matters within their classrooms first, and that various classroom management strategies and curriculum alternatives will be attempted before an offending student is referred for further discipline. Please note that teachers are expected to report serious breaches of discipline (see Section 8) as soon as possible.

  • Try to be the best teacher you can be in order to avoid many behavioural problems before they start, and work to ensure that the discipline code actually affects as few students as possible.
  • Keep accurate behavioural records, but only on students who do not respond to ordinary class management. (Documentation is needed mainly for parents to see a student's behavioural history for themselves.) Make sure to document strategies used to curb unacceptable behaviour.
  • Pre-plan and pace possible future disciplinary action to arrive at solutions as soon as possible.
  • No corporal punishment, and no unsupervised punishment or detention. Avoid confiscation of personal property if at all possible.
  • Ring David, Tum or Montira if a student needs to be removed from class for any reason; not only for misbehaviour, but also for illness or injury.
Additional Responsibilities for the Teacher:
  • Be firm and friendly. Consistently promote, reinforce and acknowledge positive behaviours for students. Counsel students after class to show them you care about helping them reach their full potential.
  • Remind students that positive behaviour attracts set positive consequences and that negative behaviour attracts set negative consequences. Focus on the behaviour not the person. Avoid personal insults or embarrassing the student, which will diminish their support and willingness to cooperate.
  • Consistently reinforce the expectations, classroom rules, and administer consequences consistently. Be prepared to follow through with consequences that are fair, practical and useful to motive students towards better behaviour. Do not make hollow threats with extreme, unfair or impractical consequences that cannot be administered.
  • Teachers can be quick to spot unacceptable student behaviours and they tend to focus on these. This can set a negative tone that causes students to be less supportive or cooperative.
  • Seek support if support is needed beyond personal class management strategies, protocols, and in-class penalties or incentives.
  • Acknowledge positive attitudes and behaviours by using the LS3 Rewards System.

Three Steps Policy for Minor Offenses:

Minor offenses include general disruptive behaviour, playing and talking in class, coming to class late, not doing assignments, not having materials, cheating in class, eating in class, cursing, or using mobile phones.

For any of these offenses, teachers may give students time to self-correct; but otherwise, a formal process involving documentation must begin.

Progression through the disciplinary process is based on the number of formal warnings, not on the number of offenses or number of informal warnings. Different types of offenses should be documented and penalized separately, but may be addressed during the same time period.

First Step:

  • One point is formally deducted.
  • A brief lecture between classes, that identifies the wrong behaviour; why the behaviour is a problem; and what behaviour is expected in the future. Remind the student that positive behaviour, negative behaviour and improvement are always noted in the student reports to parents at the end of every semester.
  • Optional detention may be assigned that very day; either at break (10 minutes) or at lunch (20 minutes) if the offense is serious enough. Detention should be assigned during the same week if at all possible.

Second Step:

  • A second point is formally deducted.
  • Detention is assigned that day or within the week, either at break (10 minutes) or at lunch (20 minutes), with a second formal lecture.
  • The coordinator is notified, and will lecture the student during that detention session if possible.

Third Step:

  • A third point is formally deducted.
  • Detention is assigned that day or within the week, either at break (10 minutes) or at lunch (20 minutes) with the coordinator.
  • The department head is notified, and may speak to the student or his parents at their discretion, however the situation may be placed in holding pattern indefinitely, with the possibility of further detention sessions with the coordinator.

Other Possible Penalties

  • If students are eating in class, the food should be confiscated until the end of the period for a first offense. For the second offense, the food is to be thrown away.
  • If a student is using a cell phone during class, it may be confiscated until the end of the period, or given to Kosum until the end of the day at the teacher's discretion.
  • As a disciplinary measure, a teacher may send a student to sit in another teacher's class.
  • Students caught cheating must redo the work during detention, and receive the lowest possible score.

One Step Policy for Serious Offenses

  • Serious Offenses include stealing, cheating on exams, gross disrespect for the teacher, damaging school property; or intimidating or bullying or fighting other students.
  • These are offenses that should go immediately to the third level, at least as far as having coordinator and department head being made aware of the incident. A special incident report is mandatory and should be filed as soon as possible.
  • Detention is assigned for two sessions within the week, one with the teacher and one with the coordinator, either at break (10 minutes) or at lunch (20 minutes).
  • The coordinator will speak to the student; and the department head may speak to the student or his parents at their discretion.

Positive and Negative Behaviours for IEP Students

These are habits that good students should have:

  • polite, respectful behaviour
  • arriving to class on time
  • bringing materials
  • close attentiveness in class
  • doing all assigned work
  • always speaking English

These behaviours are recognized, appreciated and rewarded by the teacher.

These are habits that good students need to avoid:

  • general disruptive behaviour
  • playing and talking in class
  • coming to class late
  • not doing assignments
  • not having materials

These behaviours are Minor Offenses.

These are habits good students should not have:

  • using mobile phones
  • cheating in class
  • cheating on exams
  • cursing
  • gross disrespect for the teacher
  • damaging school property
  • stealing
  • intimidating or bullying or fighting other students

These behaviours are Serious Offenses.

(Note that for administrative purposes, cheating in class and cursing would be considered Minor Misconduct; but for moral, ethical and interpersonal reasons, they should be framed as Gross Misconduct.)

Questions or concerns?

Please see me if you have any questions or concerns about any of the above, or if you need any support or assistance with classroom management and student counseling.

David Cherry,

Learning Stage 3 Coordinator

BCC Intensive English Program
Discipline Code Summary for Learning Stage Three

This policy should serve as the official policy for use when action is needed beyond personal class management strategies, protocols, and in-class penalties or incentives used by individual teachers, and is broadly outlined the following way:

First Step for a Minor Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Teacher
  • Optional Detention with the Teacher

Second Step for a Minor Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Teacher
  • Mandatory Detention with the Teacher
  • Optional Action by the Coordinator

Third Step for a Minor Offense or Serious Offense:

  • Formal Point Deduction
  • Formal Lecture from the Coordinator
  • Detention with the Coordinator
  • Optional Action by the Department Head